Experimental Mathematics Website
http://www.experimentalmath.info

<== This is a picture from the interactive geometry package Cinderella showing the behavior of 10,000 starting values in the rectangle [0,1]x[h-1,h+1], where h is the height of the horizontal line, after six iterations of the algorithm which reflects a point x in the sphere then reflects the outcome in the line and then averages the result y with x. It is an accessible prototype for a remarkable image reconstruction algorithm known variously as Douglas-Ratchford, Lion-Mercier, Fienup's method, and "divide-and-concur." Some related graphics can be generated and displayed at these URLs: Expansion Reflection (wait 30-60 seconds to see the display).

Quote of the day (refresh browser to select another):

The basic difference between playing a human and playing a supermatch against Deep Blue is the eerie and almost empty sensation of not having a human sitting opposite you. With humans, you automatically know a lot about their nationality, gender, mannerisms, and such minor things as a persistent cough or bad breath. Years ago we had to endure chain-smokers who blew smoke our way. But Deep Blue wasn't obnoxious, it was simply nothing at all, an empty chair not an opponent but something empty and relentless. -- Garry Kasparov, "Techmate", available at Forbes, 22 Feb 1999.

The complete list of quotes is available here.

This website is a repository of information on experimental and computer-assisted mathematics. It is operated by

News:

For additional news, see Math Drudge blog news.

Disclaimer and copyright

Material on this site is provided for research purposes only and does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the authors' respective institutions or funding agencies. Please send any comments or questions for this site to:

All material is copyrighted by David H. Bailey and Jonathan M. Borwein (c) 2014.

Acknowledgement of support

Bailey's research has been supported in part by the Director, Office of Computational and Technology Research, Division of Mathematical, Information, and Computational Sciences of the U.S. Department of Energy, under contract number DE-AC02-05CH11231. Borwein's research is supported in part by MITACS, by the Australian Research Council and the University of Newcastle.

Blog

The new "Math Drudge" blog is now online. It contains essays, philosophical musings, interesting quotes and exercises, all in the realm of mathematics, computing and scientific research. New items are posted on average every two weeks.

Books

For details on the authors' books on experimental mathematics, see Books

CARMA

Jonathan Borwein leads the Priority Research Centre for Computer-Assisted Research Mathematics and its Applications (CARMA) at the University of Newcastle, Australia. The researchers in this centre are very active in experimental mathematics and applied computational mathematics in general. Here is an index to the experimental mathematics resources at the CARMA site:

Financial Mathematics website and blog

Bailey and Borwein, together with their colleagues Marcos Lopez de Prado of Hess Energy Trading Co. and Qiji Jim Zhu of Western Michigan University, have recently written a series of papers in mathematical finance, with the objective of helping researchers and investors distinguish mathematically sound techniques from the unfortunately much larger body of questionable techniques that sadly pervade the finance community and financial news. Here is a website with additional information:

The Conversation articles

Bailey and Borwein have also authored a series of articles for The Conversation, an international forum of academic research and discussion based in Melbourne, Australia. A listing of these articles is available here:

Huffington Post articles

Bailey and Borwein have authored a series of articles for the Huffington Post, a very widely read online news and discussion forum based in the U.S., with over 9000 contributors and many thousands of regular readers. It was recently named the world's most influential blog/news site in an article in the U.K. Guardian. A listing of the articles by Bailey and Borwein is available here:

Commercial sites

For a list of websites of numerous commercial firms that offer mathematical software and (free) online tools, see the Commercial site page:

Courses and tutorials

For information of some courses and tutorials in the area of experimental mathematics, see the Courses page:

Institutional sites

For a list of websites of mathematical societies and journals in the general area of experimental and computational mathematics, see the Institutional site page:

Non-commercial software and tools

For a list of websites of non-commercial organizations that offer mathematical software and (free) online tools, see the Non-commercial site page:

Other Sites of interest

For a list of numerous other websites with interesting and useful information relevant to mathematics in general and computational mathematics in particular, see the Other site page:

Papers

Here are some recent papers by Bailey and/or Borwein in the area of experimental mathematics, plus a few others of interest:

Software

For some freely downloadable software for experimental math research, see the Software page:

Talks

Here are some recent presentations by Bailey and Borwein in the area of experimental mathematics: