Experimental Mathematics Website
http://www.experimentalmath.info

<== This is a picture from the interactive geometry package Cinderella showing the behavior of 10,000 starting values in the rectangle [0,1]x[h-1,h+1], where h is the height of the horizontal line, after six iterations of the algorithm which reflects a point x in the sphere then reflects the outcome in the line and then averages the result y with x. It is an accessible prototype for a remarkable image reconstruction algorithm known variously as Douglas-Ratchford, Lion-Mercier, Fienup's method, and "divide-and-concur." Some related graphics can be generated and displayed at these URLs: Expansion Reflection (wait 30-60 seconds to see the display).

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A generation ago, quants turned finance upside down. Now they're mapping out ad campaigns and building new businesses from mountains of personal data. ... These slices of our lives now sit in databases, many of them in the public domain. From a business point of view, they're just begging to be analyzed. But even with the most powerful computers and abundant, cheap storage, companies can't sort out their swelling oceans of data, much less build businesses on them, without enlisting skilled mathematicians and computer scientists. The rise of mathematics is heating up the job market for luminary quants, especially at the Internet powerhouses where new math grads land with six-figure salaries and rich stock deals. Tom Leighton, an entrepreneur and applied math professor at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, says: "All of my students have standing offers at Yahoo! and Google." Top mathematicians are becoming a new global elite. It's a force of barely 5,000, by some guesstimates, but every bit as powerful as the armies of Harvard University MBAs who shook up corner suites a generation ago. -- "Math Will Rock Your World," Business Week, 23 Jan 2006, available at Online article.

The complete list of quotes is available here.

This website is a repository of information on experimental and computer-assisted mathematics. It is operated by David H. Bailey, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (retired), and University of California, Davis (DHB website). Please send any comments or questions for this site to:

Disclaimer and copyright. Material on this site is provided for research purposes only and does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the author's institutions or any other organization. All material is copyrighted by David H. Bailey (c) 2021.

Math Scholar blog. The "Math Scholar" blog contains essays, philosophical musings, interesting quotes and exercises, all in the realm of mathematics, computing and modern science. New items are posted on average every two weeks:

Math Drudge blog (older). This blog was co-authored by Bailey and the late Jonathan Borwein, prior to Borwein's death in August 2016.

Jonathan Borwein Memorial site. In the wake of Jonathan Borwein's untimely death in August 2016, this site contains a blog of remembrances of Jon by family, friends and colleagues, together with a compendium of Jon's publications, talks and reviews of his work by others.

Mathematical Investor blog. The Mathematical Investor blog is devoted to financial mathematics and abuses of mathematics in the field:

Additional information, in alphabetical order:

  1. Books. Bailey and Jonathan Borwein (now deceased) have authored numerous books on mathematical and scientific computation. For details on the authors' books on experimental mathematics, see:
  2. Commercial sites. For a list of websites of numerous commercial firms that offer mathematical software and (free) online tools, see the Commercial site page:

  3. Institutional sites. For a list of websites of mathematical societies and journals in the general area of experimental and computational mathematics, see the Institutional site page:
  4. Non-commercial software and tools. For a list of websites of non-commercial organizations that offer mathematical software and (free) online tools, see the Non-commercial site page:
  5. Other sites of interest. For a list of numerous other websites with interesting and useful information relevant to mathematics in general and computational mathematics in particular, see the Other site page:

  6. Software. For some freely downloadable software for experimental math research, see the Software page: